Seven Notrump

In which some people who play bridge blog about it.

Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Now it can be told

Matos, the legendary founder of, and occasional contributor to, this site, has unveiled his latest flimsy excuse for not posting as much as we all want him to. Look for his triumphant return some time after the results are announced, I guess!

Meanwhile, we (I) need your contributions more than ever! You know who you are, and you know how the Post A Comment link works, right?

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Monday, November 27, 2006

How about opening leads?

Whew, it's going to take me a few weeks to collate all the responses to my informal survey, so meanwhile let's talk about opening leads. What would you lead in this situation?


West
North
East
South
Pass♥ 
Pass♦ Pass♥ 
Pass♥ PassPass
Pass
West
♠ A 9 8 6
♥ 9 7 4
♦ Q 8
♣ K J 9 2



2 comments:

  At Monday, November 27, 2006 4:38:00 PM, Blogger M said:

Either the low spade (to indicate ace) or jack of clubs (to indicate king and allow the possibility of the jack taking the trick) would be where I'd go. Unless I'm missing something (and I might be given that my cheat sheet is elsewhere at the moment) the bidding looks straightforward enough in terms of naming suits.

  At Monday, March 09, 2009 1:03:00 AM, Anonymous Randy Gentillon said:

If i decided to lead spades I would lead the ace. I would avoid playing long with a partner who underleads aces at suit contracts. The choices here are ugly beyond belief. I would probably lead a trump.

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Monday, November 20, 2006

Informal survey: room for improvement

Where do you think your/our bidding could be better? I posted the Jacoby 2NT and Roman Key Card Blackwood conventions to help with finding slam contracts (still a little ways to go there), and we've been working on our Stayman, but there are still vast untapped areas.

What bidding moments do you find too ambiguous or difficult to communicate about? What contracts do you consistently have trouble landing in? What are you always wishing you could whisper to your partner?

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Friday, November 17, 2006

Scoring reference

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Thursday, November 09, 2006

Rubber Soul 1.3


In response to popular demand, Rubber Soul, everybody's favorite rubber-scoring application, can now tally individuals' scores over a series of rubbers. Please let me know if you find any bugs or have any quibbles!

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Wednesday, November 08, 2006

Responses #1

Your partner opens one diamond, and your right-hand opponent passes. How do you respond holding each of the following hands?


A)
♠ 9 8 6
♥ 10 5 2
♦ 8 6
♣ A K 9 7 2
B)
♠ A 8
♥ K Q 2
♦ K 9 7 3
♣ Q 7 5 4







C)
♠ A 8
♥ K 8 2
♦ K J 7 3
♣ 8 7 5 4
D)
♠ K J 8
♥ K 7 6
♦ A Q 3
♣ J 7 5 4

2 comments:

  At Thursday, November 09, 2006 5:55:00 PM, Anonymous Bryan said:

A: PASS!!!
B: 3 Diamonds (No chance of a 8 card major suit, close to the 28 combined points necessary to make a 5 bid, and crap clubs.)
C: 2 Clubs (to indicate >10 points and no 4 card major) 3 Diamonds maybe, but I would assume more points.
D: 2 No Trump I guess???

  At Friday, November 10, 2006 12:05:00 AM, Blogger Paul said:

Interesting! Some of these cases are ambiguous. I'd love to hear other opinions. My instincts are:

A) 1NT. It's tempting to pass, but opener might have 18 points (under the McKenna system, as much as 21) and four clubs to an honor, which would be a shame to pass out.

B) If your partnership plays Jacoby 2NT, this might be a great time to deploy it -- 4 cards in partner's suit and 12 HCP. It's intended for major suits but I don't see why it couldn't work in a minor, especially holding 14 HCP like you do here. 3D is a good choice too, but doesn't give opener as much opportunity to describe her hand further.

C) I agree with Bryan -- 2C. To me a bid of 2D would be a signoff, showing four-card support but minimal points. I wouldn't jump to 3D with less than 15 points or longer diamonds -- I think a jump raise in partner's suit is forcing to game, and game might be a stretch here.

D) If you play Jacoby 2NT as in B) then 2NT is off-limits, so I'd say 3C.

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Tuesday, November 07, 2006

Couldn't keep my mouth shut


South
West
North
East
Pass♥ Dbl♠ 
Dbl♥ Pass♠ 
Pass♦ ♥ ♠ 
♣ PassPassPass



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Friday, November 03, 2006

Opening bid #2

Continuing Matos' idea (Hi Matos!), here's a hand I feel like I get dealt a lot:

♠ 9
♥ K Q 5
♦ A K Q 5
♣ Q 8 7 4 2


How do you bid this one? And what do you rebid when your partner shows spade strength?

2 comments:

  At Friday, November 03, 2006 6:50:00 PM, Blogger M said:

I'd open 1C. It's only 12 HCP but the singleton gives you 14 and sometimes counting it is precisely what is called for. If partner responds 1S, say 1NT. If partner jumps to 2S after your opening bid, you can say 2NT with very little to worry about, since they're indicating a hand of equal or greater strength to yours. (A 1C opener indicates minimum opening points most of the time anyway, doesn't it? That's the way I typically hear it, at least.)

  At Friday, November 03, 2006 6:53:00 PM, Blogger Paul said:

It's only 12 HCP? Are you playing aces low?

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Plastic or paper?

I like plastic cards, for their feel and their durability. Paper cards are just a dollar a deck, and easy to replace, but they get an awful swollen grubby feel as they age, and their corners get docked, and so on. You can find paper cards in a much more charming variety of vintage designs, though.


I'm fond of Kem cards, perhaps the most popular plastic card, but this poker site has opened my eyes, with evaluations of various plastic cards according to numerous criteria, including how loud they are when shuffled and the size of their pips. I'm not that obsessive, not yet. I do want to try out a set of sturdy Dal Negros, I think (brown/green Superstar backs, regular index, if you're looking for gift ideas).

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Thursday, November 02, 2006

Opening bid #1

You are the dealer and your hand looks like this:


North
♠ J 10 9
♥ 10 8 7 2
♦ A K 2
♣ A Q 8



You have 14 high card points. What do you open the bidding with?

My answer: an artificial one club. It indicates minimum opening points and guarantees nothing beyond that. One heart is too risky (no honors), and so is one notrump (puh-lease). What do you guys say?

1 comments:

  At Friday, November 03, 2006 12:33:00 PM, Blogger Paul said:

I'd say definitely 1C. The way we play, I'd even open 1C if I had A 10 8 7 in hearts and Q 8 2 in clubs. Other folks might open their better three-card minor (in this case diamonds) but that seems less helpful. You'd want your partner to have five diamonds to support that as trump, and if they have five diamonds they'll mention that over your 1C bid anyway. 1C is acknowledged as an ambiguous bid -- it either means 13 points and support for clubs, or 13 points without support for clubs. Allowing both 1C and 1D to be ambiguous bids doesn't help anything.

1D would be my opening bid if I had four of the suit and nothing better to bid. Likewise if both clubs and diamonds were four-card suits.

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