Seven Notrump

In which some people who play bridge blog about it.

Wednesday, October 18, 2006

Grand slam puzzle

Sidney Lenz
Here's a historic hand from the lovely Goren book that's fun to wrap one's mind around for a minute. It was played by Sidney Lenz (stern-looking chap over there-->), who sat South and confidently bid up to seven, holding 8 high-card points and no aces. The bidding is an educational marvel in itself -- that 2NT is reminiscent of Jacoby's.


North
East
South
West
♣ ♥ ♠ Pass
2NTPass♣ Pass
♦ Pass♣ Pass
♠ Pass♠ Pass
PassPass
Contract: 7 ♠  
Lead: ♥ J
North
♠ A Q 4
♥ K 9 6 5
♦ A 10 4
♣ A Q 7
West
♠ 10 5
♥ J 10 8 3
♦ K J 7 2
♣ 9 6 2
East
♠ 9 7 2
♥ A Q 7 4 2
♦ Q 9 8 5
♣ 3
South
♠ K J 8 6 3
♥ - -
♦ 6 3
♣ K J 10 8 5 4



If you bid that aggressively, you better be able to back it up on the table. Despite the apparently unavoidable loser, Lenz made his 13 tricks. How would you play the contract?

3 comments:

  At Wednesday, October 18, 2006 8:25:00 PM, Anonymous Bryan said:

Stumped. I was trying to figure out a way to put a "squeeze" on the defenders and then keeping track of the discards, but I can't find the right combo. Alack.

Happy birthday Paul!!!!! When are we taking you out to celebrate? Should I get hookers?

  At Wednesday, October 18, 2006 9:28:00 PM, Blogger Paul said:

Hmm, the hookers you got last year could barely count points. But if you can find a better pair, count me in.

I'll leave this puzzle open for solving.

  At Friday, October 27, 2006 7:53:00 AM, Blogger VANG said:

dummy reversal (ruff 3 hearts in hand plus 6 club tricks plus 3 trumps from dummy and the ace of diamonds = 13 tricks).

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